Japan Defense Update

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    Market Research and Other Regional Defense Updates:
    Afghanistan | Australia | Brunei | Bangladesh | China | India | Indonesia | Japan | Malaysia | Myanmar |
    North Korea | Pakistan | PhilippinesSingapore | South Korea | Sri-Lanka | Taiwan | Thailand | Vietnam.


    • DSEI 2017 Reflects the Latest Trends Oct 1, 2017 The biennial Defense Security Equipment International Exhibition (DSEI) held in London in September 2017 provided insight into British defense programs. The event attracted strong international participation, both visitors and exhibitors from 42 countries, many of which addressed UK and European defense and security requirements. The exhibition considered the second largest of its kind in the west, covered aviation, maritime and land warfare, as well as defense electronics, training simulation, security and cyber. DSEI reflected the growing concern of the Russian threat among countries within NATO. At the backdrop of DSEI was ZAPAD-2017, the large-scale military exercise held along the Russian Army with Belarus, along with its border with Europe. Another concern reflected here was the terror threat, both to military and the homeland. Several exhibitors displayed here innovative solutions that address evolving threats, including land, marine and airborne IEDs and mines. Main Highlights: Naval Modernization Equipping the Strike Brigades New Interest in Active Protection Wheeled Armored Vehicles Pocket Artillery for the Warfighter Fast Wheels for Special Forces Unmanned Systems Assume New Roles Naval Modernization Of a particular interest was the Royal Navy frigate modernization program, particularly the replacement of aging combatants with new Type 26 and Type 31e, and modernization of air defense systems on the remaining Type 23 frigates, that includes the replacement of Sea Wolf anti-missile system and Rapier Ground Based Air Defense missiles with the Common Anti-Air Modular Missile (CAMM). The Navy also plans to modernize its electronic warfare capabilities, for which Elbit Systems and Lockheed Martin announced a teaming agreement. Anti-submarine warfare, electronic warfare, and mine countermeasures were also featured, addressing acquisition programs with several NATO navies. Babcock unveiled at DSEI its Arrowhead class light frigate, developed to meet the Royal Navy requirement for eight Type 31e vessels. The new 120m vessel has a displacement of 4000 tons and an operating autonomy of 6,000 nautical miles. It is armed with ...
    • Russia to Introduce Prometheus, a Successor to S-400 in 2020 Jan 1, 2018 Amid growing demand for its current S-400 system, Almaz Antey continues development of a successor to the ‘Triumf’. Known as ‘Prometheus’, the S-500 is a more advanced air and missile defense system originally scheduled for deployment by the Russian air defense forces in 2020. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • Amphibious Ships Transformed Into Aircraft Carriers Debut in Asia-Pacific Dec 31, 2017 The planned arrival of amphibious support ship USS Wasp (LHD-1) in the Pacific Ocean introduces a new capability for amphibious support ships carrying the F-35B fifth-generation stealth fighters without relying on large aircraft carriers. Apart from the American LHD, both Japan and South Korea are interested in the new potential mating STOVL fighters with flat-deck helicopter carriers. Both countries already acquired the conventional take-off variant (F-35A), and consider operating the Short Take-Off / Vertical Landing (STOVL) B version from ships. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • RSM-56 Bulava Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile Dec 31, 2017 On June 2017 the missile submarine Yuri Dolgoruky, successfully test-fired an RSM-56 Bulava Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) from a submerged position in the Barents Sea, off the northern coast of Russia. The warhead impacted the designated target at the Kura practice range in Kamchatka, 3,600 miles away. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • Toward an All-New Russian ICBM Force Dec 31, 2017 As Russia continues the modernization of its strategic missile force, twenty additional RS-24s Yars ICBMs will be delivered in 2018. By 2020 these new missiles are expected to replace all the remaining 30 silo-based UR-100 (NATO Reporting name: SS-19 Stiletto) liquid-fueled ICBM. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • A Stronger, More Powerful Satan-2 Dec 31, 2017 Moscow is moving to replace its heaviest strategic missile – the R-36M2 Satan, with a new liquid-propelled ICBM – RS-28 Sarmat. The need for a new missile is evident since its predecessor, the R-36 (SS-18) Satan that uses a liquid propulsion system designed and produced in Ukraine, that cannot be relied upon to support the weapon. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • New Weapons Initiatives Violating Strategic Arms Control Treaties Dec 31, 2017 As Russia continues the modernization of its strategic forces, Moscow is testing the limits of compliance to arms reduction treaties it is committed to. The United States complained about two Russian weapon categories that allegedly violate the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty – the RS-26 Rubezh and 9M729 Iskander-K. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • Russia Continues Modernizing its Strategic Missile Force Dec 31, 2017 The challenges posed by ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons, not only those developed and tested by North Korea and Iran, but the large Chinese and Russian nuclear arsenals being modernized, and enhanced with new capabilities that pose significant new challenges to American missile defenses. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • IAI Consolidates Civil Activities into +US$1 Billion Commercial Aviation Group Dec 28, 2017 Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is strengthening its commercial aviation activities by forming a single, business-oriented group that unifies six business lines currently distributed in different corporate activities. The new structure is likely to focus IAI’s activities to meet the unique challenges and opportunities of the commercial aviation market. The transformation is implemented at a time in which many countries bring home their manufacturing operations and are fighting aggressively for market shares, challenging IAI to sharpen its offering in defense and commercial aviation alike. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • Canada to buy Australia’s used Hornets Dec 24, 2017 Canada plans to buy 18 used F/A-18 Hornet fighter planes from Australia to fill the air forces’ fighters shortage. The purchase is regarded as a stopgap measure as Ottawa moves forward with a more permanent selection of a future replacement for the CF-18. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr
    • US Approves Weapon Supply to Ukraine Dec 24, 2017 The U.S. administration plan to support Ukraine reached an important milestone this weekend as President Donald J. Trump approved a support plan to Ukraine, which, for the first time since the U.S. began its assistance plan in 2014. The total value of U.S. military support to Ukraine, since 2014 is estimated at more than US$750 million. Share this:PrintEmailRedditPocketLinkedInPinterestTwitterFacebookGoogleWhatsAppMoreTumblr

    Research Focus: Japanese Defense Industry to 2016

    Japanese defense budget is the fifth-largest in the world and recorded a CAGR of 10% from 2007-2011

    The Japanese defense budget is the fifth-largest in the world and recorded a CAGR of 10.04% during the review period (2007 – 2011). Japan has capped its defense budget at 1% of GDP, and is expected to continue to do so over the forecast period (2012 – 2016). The Japanese MoD spends the majority of its defense budget on revenue expenditure, which includes the salaries of personnel and maintenance of infrastructure. In the armed forces, the Japanese army receives 37% of the budget, while the navy and air force receive respective shares of 23% and 24%. The budget is primarily driven by the perceived threat from North Korea’s missile tests and the security of sea trade routes, as the country imports the majority of its minerals and food from foreign countries.

    The Japanese government’s policy to ban arms exports to other countries makes it difficult for defense companies in Japan to maintain profitability. Since 2003, 20 companies have discontinued their participation in the fighter jet manufacturing business. Furthermore, as the Japanese government makes a minimal amount of procurements, domestic companies may diversify from the defense industry and enter other civilian industries. The Japanese government allocates 18% of its defense budget for equipment procurement. Defense equipment manufacturers are required to spend on R&D or purchase technology licenses from foreign OEMs, which in turn will increase the cost of the product.

    Japan has a well-developed domestic industry, which is supported by government procurement. The domestic defense industry also procures production licenses of technology that is unavailable domestically, in order to supply the Japanese MoD with the most advanced equipment available.Japanese defense imports are expected to increase over the forecast period, partly due to government plans to procure fighter aircraft.

    For more information on “Japanese Defense Industry to 2016″ (product ID: # Defense-Update DF0077MR Request for Quotation). The report is available in electronic form from ICD. Single User License costs: $1,250.-

    To order this report and request more information please contact: Rosezena Pare


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