The new version doubles the missile load of the previous trailer-based version operated by a NATO customer, and improves some of the system's target acquisition and support elements which were already integrated into the vehicle-mounted version of the system, developed for South Korea. Photo: RAFAEL
The new version doubles the missile load of the previous trailer-based version operated by a NATO customer, and improves some of the system’s target acquisition and support elements which were already integrated into the vehicle-mounted version of the system, developed for South Korea. Photo: RAFAEL

Rafael Advanced Defence Systems has unveiled a new trailer-mounted, remotely-controlled launch system for the Spike Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) multi-purpose tactical missile at DSEI 2015.

Dubbed SPARC, and developed over 30 years ago to engage heavy armor formations deep behind enemy lines, Israel has increasingly been using the Spike/NLOS in asymmetric warfare in recent years, employing the weapon’s long range and high precision to deliver measured responses or preemptive attacks against asymmetric and terrorist targets across the borders with Lebanon, Syria and Gaza.

Sparc is expected to enter production this year and to augment the launchers already operating with the customer. The trailer-based system was originally designed to operate at forward bases, independent of dedicated vehicles, as it can rapidly deploy with light troops, supported by various vehicles, primarily lightweight tactical utility vehicles.

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Spike NLOS is designed for launch from aerial, naval and land platforms. photo: RAFAEL
Spike NLOS is designed for launch from aerial, naval and land platforms. This specific configuration, based on Plasan’s Sandcat, was designed to meet the South Korean requirement. photo: RAFAEL