Silver Shadow Unveils a Production Ready Version of Gilboa Assault Pistol Rifle (APR)

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Amos Golan, Silver Shadow CEO demonstrate the lightweight and compact Gilboa APR. Photo: Tamir Eshel, Defense Update

In our coverage of last year’s event we unveiled the new Gilboa Assault Pistol Rifle (APR). This year, Silver Shadow is displaying a Production ready model APR, an ultra compact weapon designed specifically for close quarter combat, VIP protection and special forces and commanders; the APR will also offer an excellent survival weapon for helicopter aircrews, offering improved range, accuracy and lethality, compared to pistols.

Amos Golan, Silver Shadow CEO demonstrate the lightweight and compact Gilboa APR. Photo: Tamir Eshel, Defense Update

The overall length of the Gilboa APR is 398mm, (15.6″) and its loaded weight is 2.820 kg (including a full 30 round magazine). The chrome lined barrel is 165mm (6.5″) in length, firing 5.56×45 (M-855/SS-109) rounds. The handgun comes with four Mil-STD 1913 Accessory Rails (Picatiny) providing attachment options for a wide range of accessories.

The new patented design incorporates a combined gas and recoil spring actuating system integrated in the weapon’s body, a feature enabling the designers to optimize the foldable stock in terms of weight and ergonomics, allowing the shooter to employ the weapon in shoulder firing position. In fact, the APR remains fully operational with the stock completely detached. Compared to Bullpup designs the APR is claimed to offer lighter, smaller and safer performance, as the chamber position is maintained as far as possible from the shooter, contributing to safer operation. Other ergonomic elements include a pistol grip that comes with built-in storage compartment.

The overall length of the Gilboa APR is 398 mm (15.6") with 165mm (6.5") barrel. The loaded weight is 2.82 kg (including a full 30 round magazine). The Gilboa APR comes with four Mil-STD 1913 Accessory Rails (Picatiny) providing attachment options for a wide range of accessories. Photo: Tamir Eshel, Defense-Update