Market Research and Other Other Regional Defense Updates:
Afghanistan | Australia | Brunei | Bangladesh | China | India | Indonesia | Japan | Malaysia | Myanmar |
North Korea | Pakistan | PhilippinesSingapore | South Korea | Sri-Lanka | Taiwan | Thailand | Vietnam.


  • Thai Navy to Operate Hermes-900 on Maritime Surveillance and SaR Missions Sep 28, 2022Thai Navy to Operate Hermes-900 on Maritime Surveillance and SaR Missions
    Elbit Systems has received a contract valued at $120 million to supply Hermes 900 Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and training capabilities to the Royal Thai Navy. The contract will be performed over three years.
  • IDF Fields Thousands of Interactive Information Devices Assisting Dismounted Leaders Sep 28, 2022IDF Fields Thousands of Interactive Information Devices Assisting Dismounted Leaders
    Israel Defense Forces have received thousands of ORION Systems, providing a smartphone-based hand-held interactive information devices for junior officers and team leaders. The ‘Olar’ and ‘Amud’ systems as they are called by the IDF is designed as rugged and secured mobile device based on the Android platform. The system enables mission planning, navigation, positioning, and enhanced situational awareness using a 3 dimensional GIS database and Augmented Reality (AR) capabilities.
  • Israel’s Rafael Acquires British Land Systems’ Specialist Pearson Engineering Sep 28, 2022Israel's Rafael Acquires British Land Systems' Specialist Pearson Engineering
    Israel’s defense company Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Ltd. has completed the acquisition of the British defense specialist company Pearson Engineering Ltd. The acquisition was executed under a stock purchase agreement (SPA), transferring 100% of the ownership. The acquisition includes Pearson’s metalworks subsidiary company Responsive Engineering Ltd.
  • Yemeni Houthis Display Iranian Drones and Loitering Missiles Sep 27, 2022Yemeni Houthis Display Iranian Drones and Loitering Missiles
    Among many types of loitering missiles and attack drones displayed by the Houthis at the recent parade in Sanaa was the local version of the Iranian Shahed 136 – the Wa’id, new models of Samad and Qhasef, loitering missiles, Rased weaponized mini-drones, VTOL variant of Mersad-2, and the Masir hexacopter weaponized drone that was also demonstrated in formation flight.
  • New Ballistic Missiles Displayed at the Houthi Military Parade Sep 27, 2022New Ballistic Missiles Displayed at the Houthi Military Parade
    New ballistic, cruise and loitering missiles were shown by the Houthis in the recent military parade in Sanaa, Yemen. Among the new missiles were several types of precision-guided ballistic missiles, capable of attack at ranges from 300 to 1,400 km, carrying warheads weighing up to half a ton. All missiles are believed to be Iranian designed, they were likely delivered to Yemen as pre-assembled or knocked down kits.
  • Houthis a New Cruise Missile, Quds-3 Sep 27, 2022Houthis a New Cruise Missile, Quds-3
    New ballistic, cruise and loitering missiles were shown by the Houthis in the recent military parade in Sanaa, Yemen. Among the new missiles on display was the Quds-3 cruise missile, believed to be a new, longer-range variant of the Iranian Soumar cruise missile.
  • Houthi’s New Naval Weapons Extend Their Reach 200 nm into the Gulf of Aden Sep 26, 2022Houthi's New Naval Weapons Extend Their Reach 200 nm into the Gulf of Aden
    The Iranians and Houthis have gradually extended the range of their weapons from tens to a few hundred nautical miles. Rather than employing these weapons on board ships to extend range, they can now reach beyond 200 nm, using the new ballistic anti-ship missiles, practically blocking the movements of naval vessels well beyond Yemen’s coastal waters.
  • Orbiter 4 (NITZOZ) UAS to Enter IAF Service Sep 21, 2022Orbiter 4 (NITZOZ) UAS to Enter IAF Service
    Israel’s Air & Space Force (IAF) has recently reactivated the 144th squadron at Hatzor air force base, a new unit destined to operate the Orbiter 4 Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) under a new multi-domain force sharing IAF, ground, and intelligence forces assets. These platforms will provide the aerial layer of Israel’s Defense Forces (IDF) ‘Storm Clouds’ program.
  • Rheinmetall and UVision Awarded First Order for HERO-30 Loitering Munitions Sep 3, 2022Rheinmetall and UVision Awarded First Order for HERO-30 Loitering Munitions
    Rheinmetall and its partner UVision have won the first order from a major European NATO military force for HERO loitering munitions. The customer, a special forces unit, placed an initial order for Hero-30 combat and training munitions, simulator, training courses as well as integrated logistics equipment and support. This first order is worth a figure in the single-digit million-euro range with possible additional orders that might be expected. The exact number of munitions to be supplied is classified. The order was placed in July 2022, with delivery scheduled to take place by 2023.
  • New Launchers for Laser Guided Rocket Aug 31, 2022New Launchers for Laser Guided Rocket
    While large caliber weapons such as the M142 HIMARS and its M31 GMLRS rockets are making the headlines in the Russian-Ukrainian War, smaller, more agile guided rockets have evolved, utilizing the laser-guided light rockets. Initially, these weapons utilized standard launchers, but recent developments from Thales, BAE Systems, and L3Harris have optimized the use of such weapons by helicopters, special operations forces, and unmanned vehicles.

Research Focus: Singapore Defense Market

The Singapore Defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2016

Singapore has the largest defense expenditure in South East Asia, and, in 2008, the country had the world’s fourth-largest per capita defense expenditure, behind only Israel, the US and Oman. The country’s defense expenditure is high due to the small size of the country’s armed forces and consequent ever-present requirement to upgrade the country’s defense equipment and procure advanced technology in order to compensate for the country’s lack of manpower.

The full 151 page report (dated December 2011) is available from Defense-Update ICD for $1,250.-

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Singapore has the largest defense expenditure in the South East Asian region, and the country’s defense spending is expected to increase substantially by 2016. The country’s defense expenditure is primarily driven by the threat of terrorist organizations such as Jemaah Islamiah, and the country’s focus on the protection of important trade routes, such as the Strait of Singapore and the Strait of Malacca, from the threat of piracy. Singapore’s army is relatively small, resulting in the country using technology as a force multiplier, another factor which increases its defense expenditure. The country’s small size also renders it unable to provide adequate training facilities for its armed forces personnel. As such, the country relocates army training facilities to foreign countries, a decision that creates the need to purchase training stations and detachments overseas.

From 2011 to 2016, (the forecast period), Singapore is expected to invest in advanced technology for its armed forces, including purchases in areas such as such as stealth technology, unmanned technology and precision guided systems. Homeland security expenditure is also expected to increase the demand for CCTV, advanced electronic systems and biometric checking.

As Singapore is investing in advanced technology for its armed forces, it requires technology transfer agreements for all defense procurements in order to ensure future repair and maintenance and to enable the customization of equipment in accordance with the country’s needs. Additionally, Singapore’s FDI (Foreign Direct Investment) policy allows foreign defense companies to establish a fully-owned subsidiary in the country and, in order to further encourage investment, favorable tax laws also exist for foreign companies.

Singapore procures the majority of its defense equipment from foreign companies, with its defense imports driven by the country’s policy of utilizing technology to improve the efficiency of its armed forces. Some of Singapore’s major defense imports include arms, ships, missile systems and armored vehicles. Historically, the largest supplier of arms to Singapore was the US; however, from 2005 to 2010 (the review period), countries such as France and Germany have made substantial inroads into the country’s defense industry.

The Singaporean Government prefers technology transfer agreements for defense equipment acquisitions, and, as a result, this is the most common route for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to enter the domestic defense industry. In order to procure spare parts and other common equipment, the government also has an online portal, the Ministry of Defense Internet Procurement System (MIPS), through which registered suppliers are issued with a smart card, and only such companies are allowed to enter the bidding process for defense equipment. Defense suppliers obtain a smart card through registration with the defense ministry. Additionally, Singapore has devised an innovative procurement method through lease-to-own arrangements, a policy that substantially reduces initial capital investment, gives Singapore early access to advanced defense equipment and reduces Foreign Military Sales (FMS) commission. Foreign OEMs can therefore enter Singapore’s defense industry by offering equipment through lease-to-own arrangements.

Singapore is a relatively small country, with a total land mass of 710 square kilometers. The size of the country limits the land available for the establishment of manufacturing facilities, a factor which acts as a barrier for foreign companies considering investing in Singapore. The country’s declining birth rate, small population and resultant labor shortage also act as barriers to entry. The country’s acute land shortage is reflected by the fact that the Singaporean Government trains military personnel at foreign facilities.

For more information on “The Singapore Defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2016″ (product ID: # Defense-Update DF0074MR Request for Quotation). The report is available in electronic form from ICD. Single User License costs: $1,250.-

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